In November 1996, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) published its final report of 4,000 laterals containing 440 recommendations. Indian boarding schools have been the subject of a chapter. [2] In 1998, in response to the RCAP Gathering Strength: Canada`s Aboriginal Action Plan,[9:3] unveiled a “long-term and broad policy approach in response to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, which contained the `Declaration of Reconciliation: Learning from the Past`, in which “the Canadian government recognizes and apologizes to them, the physical and sexual abuse in Indian boarding schools and their role in the development and management of boarding schools. [10] Indigenous communities, governments and ecclesial organizations have long struggled to heal the wounds caused by the boarding school system. Beginning in the 1980s, former students launched legal campaigns to get the government and churches to acknowledge the abuse of the system and compensate. In 1998, the federal government issued a reconciliation statement acknowledging the mistreatment of former students and established the multi-million euro Aboriginal Healing Foundation. The alternative dispute resolution procedure was launched in 2003 and provides an out-of-court mechanism for determining compensation and providing psychological support. The IRSSA, which came into effect on September 19, 2007, involved discussions between representatives of former students, the Assembly of First Nations and other Aboriginal organizations, the churches involved, and the federal government. Map of the distribution of independent assessment colonies. On September 30, 2019, the names of 2800 children who died in boarding schools in Canada were released by the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation at a ceremony in Gatineau, Quebec (see Truth and Reconciliation Commission). The ceremony was the culmination of years of archival research of government and church books dealing with Indigenous children in 80 schools across the country, with recordings dating back to the 1890s. According to archivists, another 1,600 children who died in boarding schools are not named, and researchers continue to search records to discover their identities. The commemoration is part of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which supported regional and national activities that honored, educated, recalled and honored Indian Residential School (IRS) alumni, their families and communities. The Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA), the largest class action settlement in Canadian history to date, recognized the damage done to Indigenous peoples by boarding schools in Canada and created a multi-billion dollar fund to help former students heal.

The IRSSA, which came into force in September 2007, consists of five main elements: common experience payment, the Independent Assessment Process, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, commemoration, and health and healing services. In Regina, Saskatchewan, on December 15, 2006, Justice Dennis Ball authorized the “settlement of class and individual boarding claims” under the IRSSA. [17] The IRSSA has made available to the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) $960 million, “a comparison fund for claims of sexual abuse, serious physical abuse and other illegal acts” with the IRS, which “makes money available to those who have suffered serious physical and/or sexual abuse in an Indian boarding school. The maximum payment is $275,000, but an additional $250,000 can be granted for actual loss of income entitlements. “[19] As of December 31, 2012, more than $1.7 billion has been spent through the CAP. . . .